Walk On

The Champions Who Walked Among Us

THE WEP’S ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE CHALLENGE, FEBRUARY 16-18, 2022, THE HARLOT AND HER SCARLET CORD, CREATIVE NON-FICTION BY Pat Garcia


Tagline: One ounce of love is all you need.

Single, intelligent, robust, and well-groomed, this woman was a  hooker who managed her company with pride. Quick-witted and clever, her shrewdness demanded respect from her customers. She did not tolerate foolishness. As managing director, she had learned early in life how to pit herself against the male dominating class. In her line of work, she needed,

•           This hardness, 

•           This steadfastness, 

•           This I can do anything mentality. 

She shunned popularity, yet she couldn’t avoid it. Everyone from the prominent to the penniless pauper knew her address. 

Female friends—No, thank you. She learned early to refrain from friendships. Her kind represented the scum of society.  

After all, she committed acts of intimacy genteel women would never dream of doing. For them, intimacy represented a charitable act of kindness toward their husbands that had to be tolerated. 

Never mind that the prostitute was the bread earner in her family; forget that she ran a profitable establishment; don’t even consider that she took pride in doing the best with what she had. 

The fact that she sold her body labeled her as riffraff, unfit to be respected––with the exception of the nighttime pleasures she gave to whoever could afford it.

When the two men showed up at her hotel, she knew something was about to occur, which would destroy her and her family if she did not take matters into her own hands and bargain quickly. The men were different and stood out among all the other guests that frequented her establishment. Besides, contrary to most men, they weren’t demanding she spread her legs to practice her trade. They showed respect to a woman the town called a whore.

Can you see her?

A woman shunned by society,

•           A prostitute, 

•           A hooker, 

•           A whore,

Offering the two men lodging for the night up in the roof of her house. She even hid them under stalks of flax. She was a woman with enough love in her heart to lie when the king of Jericho sent her a message demanding that the two men be turned over to him.

Before the men lay down for the night, the prostitute went up to the roof to negotiate. Bargaining was something she excelled in, and she got what she wanted, freedom and safety for all her loved ones and made the spies swear to it.  

As the spies departed her home, they said, “This oath you made us swear will not be binding on us unless, when we enter the land, you have tied this scarlet cord in the window through which you let us down, and unless you have brought your father and mother, your brothers and all your family into your house. If any of them go outside your house into the street, their blood will be on their own heads; we will not be responsible. As for those who are in the house with you, their blood will be on our head if a hand is laid on them. But if you tell what we are doing, we will be released from the oath you made us swear.” *

This woman changed her destiny and the destiny of her whole family. That’s all it took. One ounce of love, and Rahab, the harlot, became a heroine. All you need is love.

                                                            ***

Wishing all of you the very best. 

Until next time,

Shalom aleichem

Pat Garcia

*Verses taken from Joshua 2:17-20, New International Version 2011, Zondervan, a part of HarperCollins Christian Publishing

43 Comments

  1. A lovely re-telling of a poignant tale. Women and their bodies have had a complicated relationship for a very long time indeed, as have women and men, and morality.

    So true. All you need is love, indeed. Thank you so much for sharing this, Pat.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Damyanti. Yes, I so agree that women and their bodies have had complications for a long time. We women continue to abuse our bodies to look like someone that we are not. We have a long way to go to accepting ourselves for who we are. However, that would put the fashion and cosmetic industry out of business.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  2. Your writing always evokes emotion, Pat! Another well-written tale.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Jemi. That’s a big compliment and I accept it, coming from an author like you who has so many published books under her belt.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  3. Welcome back. And back with a powerful and haunting tale too.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Elephant’s Child. It’s good to be back. I missed participating last time, but it could not be avoided.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  4. Your story made me curious, Pat. It sent me to Google to search for the name of Rahab to learn more.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Olga. That you went to Google to search for Rehab made me very happy. So many men and women don’t talk about this wonderful woman.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  5. That’s a great analogy of the story. Love is indeed, all you need.
    Nancy

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Nancy. I agree. Love changes people.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  6. I always enjoy reading your writing, Pat! Well done! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Yvette, for your support. It means a lot to me.
      Shalom aleichem

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Thanks Pat, for revisiting an old tale. I love Rahab the harlot as a heroine. I enjoyed the way you formatted your flash also, giving your reader time to consider their assumptions on a prostitute’s life. She had love a’plenty to share.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Denise. I love Rahab’s heroic character. She was a powerful woman that cared for others.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  8. So much from a person who people expect so little of because of their view of her trade. Powerful: the story and the character. (Shannon @thewarriormuse dot com)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Shannon. That was my thought too. However, it took me some years to grow into maturity to see Rahab’s courage and her strength.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  9. Nilanjana Bose

    A grand retelling of the Biblical story! Really loved the characterisation of Rahab in your flash. Excellent work, Pat.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you very much, Nilanjana. Rahab’s character fascinates me tremendously.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  10. Shirley Harris-Slaughter

    Interesting post. Have to come back and dive into it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Shirley, for coming by. I hope you do get the chance to come back and dive into it.
      All the best.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  11. lgkeltner

    Such a wonderful retelling! I love Rahab and how her love changed the course of things. Such a powerful woman. She didn’t let anyone’s negative thoughts about her bring her down.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, LG. No she didn’t let anyone’s negative thoughts about her bring her down. That is one of the reasons that I admire her.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  12. A thoughtful rendering of the life of a prostitute, Pat, plus an intriguing story. 👌 I was completely floored to learn this is a story from the bible. (Like Olga, I did a Google search for Rahab.) It seemed to be set in modern times. Nice twist! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Debbie. I love Rahab. For me, she was a woman with strength and power.
      Shalom aleichem

      Liked by 1 person

  13. How real you made this biblical tale. You are a gifted storyteller.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Kalpana. That is one of my spiritual gifts, and I am thankful for it.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  14. I love your modern spin on a profession that’s as old as time itself, dating back to about 2400 BC in ancient Babylonia, and which highlights the “love-hate perspective” with regards to the female anatomy.
    For me, such a timely topic, especially since gender-based violence has reached an all-time high in South Africa, resulting in three new pieces of legislation being added, which are aimed at strengthening efforts to end gender-based violence in our country.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Michelle, for sharing. I had no idea that gender-based violence was prevalent in South Africa. World News these days are so broken down in different sections of countries.
      All the best.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  15. Just wow. Your characterization is brilliant. I love following her mental journey, discovering the power of her integrity, self-awareness, and grit. I think we all have something to learn from her. I want to see her on screen now. Thanks for this.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Pennie. I agree. We all have something to learn from Rahab, and I would love to see her on screen.
      Have a lovely week.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  16. What a great telling Pat. Such a story of faith in one we wouldn’t usually trust and redemption of one who we wouldn’t usually consider “deserving” of it. Thank you for challenging our misconceptions and shining light on the judgemental nature of our souls. A truly great piece.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Carol. You hit the point directly. Letting our misconceptions and judgemental nature determine how we perceive a person is not how God perceives a person. Maybe, we need to do away with our judgemental nature that tend to build fences instead of openness.

      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  17. hilarymb

    Hi Pat – this is a brilliant take on the prompt … and yes something for us to learn from your storytelling. I too had to look her up – I’m going to investigate the link with William Blake – not sure when … but she has been notched into my William Blake ideas … when I learn more about them both – I have books here and notes on an exhibition I visited. Excellent – loved it – cheers Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Hilary. Rahab was a remarkable woman, in my opinion. If you look in the book of Matthew, the first chapter, you will find Rahab again. She was the mother of Boaz, who was the father of Obed and Obed’s mother was Ruth, a Moabite. You will also find Rahab mentioned again when you go the book of Hebrews, in chapter 11, verse 31.
      Have a great week.
      Shalom aleichem

      Liked by 1 person

      • hilarymb

        Hi Pat – thanks for the extra references … cheers Hilary

        Liked by 1 person

      • You’re welcome, Hilary.
        Shalom aleichem

        Like

  18. An intriguing story and well written, what a great heroine she turned out to be.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Sally. Yes, she was quite a heroine. I am happy that there are still women like her today that dare to step out and speak up.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  19. I hadn’t heard of this person or story before. Exxxxxxxcellent telling! Very enjoyable. Goes well with the prompt.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Hi Miss Pat,
    Your story reminds me of the old saying, “Never judge a book by it’s cover.” I love Rahab. Despite being judged, she stayed true to herself and her faith and in so doing was strong and powerful.
    Thanks for a terrific retelling of the Biblical story.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Wonderful retelling. Yes, love turns you into a miracle. And mostly when nothing is expected from people, love makes them come through in wonderful ways.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Highly entertaining. A good infusion of faith.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Amazing women-conquerors through the bible, all the wars, and even settled the west (US) but more amazing is that they are always given the holy title of whore. What is the male equivalent? Messiah? No insult intended! Thank you, Pat!

    Like

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